01 05
How Our Customers Can Remotely Test or Develop Their Payloads via Remote Access to a Dedicated M6P Model
Behind the Scenes
  • 2019-01-28

When we talk about faster, better and cheaper access to space here at NanoAvionics, we fully embrace the philosophy – not only through the highly integral design of our products but also through the whole process of nano-satellite mission development.

One of the advantages of working with NanoAvionics in making your mission a reality is the ability to remotely test your payload’s software compatibility with our M6P nanosatellite bus BEFORE making a purchasing decision. Our Customers also use this feature for payload development, and for running mission-critical tests such as hardware in the loop and debugging.

Rack of M6P FlatSats

How does it work? Our Partners and Customers can remotely connect their payload to a dedicated M6P model laid on the table. This model, called a FlatSat, is connected to a ground station simulation. Through network access our Customers can run mission tasks, write and test their scripts, do further developments and check if their payload and M6P can “understand” each other well (as if they were real team mates, like Batman & Robin, or Kirk & Spock). The FlatSat provides the same full functionality as the actual M6P hardware in your laboratory, without the need to buy all the more expensive equipment first.

Our Customers find this approach to be much more convenient (and cost-efficient) than the traditional way of purchasing two satellite buses – the engineering and flight module. At the same time, it provides some risk diversification in cases where there is just a proto-flight nanosatellite bus. In addition, this solution is also time-efficient since the Customer can start their software development right away without any delays (such as waiting for some hardware to arrive in-house) and with help immediately available from the NanoAvionics team.

Every Customer of NanoAvionics interested in this approach will get their own dedicated FlatSat stacked in a special rack (see picture) with 24/7 access for the duration of their developments and tests.